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In her new book, ‘White Fragility’ author DiAngelo claims ‘nice’ white people are the worst racists and attacks those who disagree

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13.07.2021

Having successfully turned an extended online article into a New York Times bestseller, introduced a previously oblivious audience to the idea of everyday ‘white supremacy’ and ‘white fragility’, and made it clear that white women crying is something we should avoid at all costs, Robin DiAngelo’s managed to strike gold in the racism business.

Who can begrudge her? In her new book, ‘Nice Racism: How Progessive White People Perpetuate Racial Harm’ (why do these academics always give the entire game away in the title?), DiAngelo relates the miserable poverty she endured when growing up, living with her single mother and sisters in their car at times, as they struggled to find somewhere to live.

It explains a lot. Why she identifies with the outsiders, why her childhood lack of hygiene, rotting teeth, and smell, and the way friends saw her family – “‘What’s wrong with them?’ I stopped, riveted. What would be her mother’s answer? What was wrong with us? The mother held her finger to her lips and whispered, ‘Shhh, they’re poor.’” – equipped her with a deep sense of social justice. And how that manifested into an obsession with race.

She doesn’t shy away from her own racism, which, of course, is all part of her allure. She recounts her experience of a restaurant meal with a companion, pre-enlightenment, where the other couple at their table were black. In order to prove her credentials as non-racist, she spent the evening regaling her dinner companions with sneering tales of her racist family, only realising much later how tone deaf she had been and how she must have come across to two people she had never met before.

She understood that her attempt to convince the couple she was not racist was actually kinda racist. This was........

© RT.com


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