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Parliament passes bill declaring Rwanda safe – but can it really be called a law at all?

After months of deadlock, the House of Lords withdrew its opposition to the safety of Rwanda (asylum and immigration) bill, meaning that it will...

latest 4

The Conversation

Joshua Jowitt

Labour can afford to be far more ambitious with its economic policies – voters are on board

To say that the Labour party is flying high in the polls is something of an understatement. But despite its consistent lead against the Tories, the...

latest 3

The Conversation

Matthew T. Johnson

Flat faces and difficulty breathing: how pet trends has harmed animal health – and what we can we do about it

Dogs come in all shapes and sizes. We’ve moulded some of them to have large protruding eyes, sloping backs and shortened legs through selective...

latest 2

The Conversation

Jacqueline Boyd

Flat faces and difficulty breathing: how pet trends have harmed animal health – and what we can we do about it

Dogs come in all shapes and sizes. We’ve moulded some of them to have large protruding eyes, sloping backs and shortened legs through selective...

latest 1

The Conversation

Jacqueline Boyd

UK smoking ban would have many benefits for public health – but only if it’s effectively implemented

MPs have recently voted to ban anyone in England born after 2009 from buying cigarettes, as part of the government’s plan to achieve a smoke-free...

latest 1

The Conversation

Andrew Lee

TikTok and Instagram are full of misleading information about birth control — and wellness influencers are helping drive these narratives

There’s been an increase in content posted on TikTok and Instagram recently discussing the alleged dangers of birth control. Content creators...

latest 1

The Conversation

Stephanie Alice Baker

Turkey’s suppression of the Kurdish political movement continues to fuel a deadly armed conflict

The world has 91 democracies and 88 autocracies. Yet 71% of the world’s population (some 5.7 billion people) are living under autocratic rule, a...

latest 1

The Conversation

Recep Onursal

Gaza war: artificial intelligence is changing the speed of targeting and scale of civilian harm in unprecedented ways

As Israel’s air campaign in Gaza enters its sixth month after Hamas’s terrorist attacks on October 7, it has been described by experts as one of...

latest 1

The Conversation

Lauren Gould

‘I might as well stop and diversify into holiday lets’ – new research reveals the reality of farming after Brexit

The UK’s farming landscape has changed dramatically since Brexit. Agricultural policy has been adjusted, and EU subsidies, which funded UK farming...

latest 1

The Conversation

Peter Gittins

A Nasa rover has reached a promising place to search for fossilised life on Mars

While we go about our daily lives on Earth, a nuclear-powered robot the size of a small car is trundling around Mars looking for fossils. Unlike...

latest 1

The Conversation

Sean Mcmahon

Baby Reindeer: how the Netflix TV show brings a fresh perspective to male sexual victimisation

_This article discusses sexual assault and contains spoilers for Baby Reindeer. _ Baby Reindeer is a gripping new Netflix show based on a true...

latest 1

The Conversation

Dimitris Akrivos

From the coast to the deep sea, changing oxygen levels affect marine life in different ways

Earth’s atmosphere maintains a constant level of oxygen, whether it is a wintry, rainy day or hot summer. Across the ocean, oxygen concentrations...

latest 1

The Conversation

Marco Fusi

The obstacles that could still stop flights to Rwanda from taking off

Rishi Sunak has finally secured the legislation he needs to support his Rwanda plan. A late night session of ping pong between the two houses of...

latest 0

The Conversation

Natalie Hodgson

Does ejaculating often reduce your risk of prostate cancer?

In terms of men’s health issues, prostate cancer features high on the agenda. It’s the second most diagnosed cancer in men globally – closely...

latest 0

The Conversation

Daniel Kelly

Sudan: civil war stretches into a second year with no end in sight

In the early hours of April 15 2023, the Rapid Support Forces (RSF) – a Sudanese paramilitary force – attacked the military airstrip in the town...

latest 0

The Conversation

Jan Pospisil

Abigail: child vampire horror falls prey to antiquated gender stereotypes

Warning: this article contains spoilers for Abigail. The horror film Abigail sets out to offer a new and refreshing perspective on the vampire...

latest 0

The Conversation

Lizzie Wright

Why is the London Stock Exchange losing out to the US – and can it stem the flow?

London Stock Exchange (LSE), which can trace its heritage to the coffee houses of the 17th century, is failing. The volume of shares traded is...

latest 0

The Conversation

Rama Kanungo

Scotland’s hate crime law: the problem with using public order laws to govern online speech

Scotland’s new hate crime law came into force on April 1, sparking immediate controversy over its potential effects on freedom of speech and...

latest 0

The Conversation

Laura Higson-Bliss

Why Germany ditched nuclear before coal – and why it won’t go back

One year ago, Germany took its last three nuclear power stations offline. When it comes to energy, few events have baffled outsiders more. In the...

latest 0

The Conversation

Trevelyan Wing

Beyoncé and Dolly Parton’s versions of Jolene represent two sides of southern femininity

On her new album, Cowboy Carter, Beyoncé puts a new spin on Dolly Parton’s classic song, Jolene. Though the album has achieved critical acclaim...

yesterday 20

The Conversation

Kadian Pow

Sex differences don’t disappear as a country’s equality develops – sometimes they become stronger

The more gender equal a society is, the more similar men and women will be, adopting more similar interests, personality traits and behavioural...

yesterday 10

The Conversation

Agneta Herlitz

Ukraine war: US$60 billion in US military aid a major morale boost but no certain path to victory

It took months of delays and desperate pleas from Ukraine, but the US House of Representatives has finally passed a bill authorising US$60 billion...

yesterday 3

The Conversation

Stefan Wolff

Parrot fever cases amid a ‘mysterious’ pneumonia outbreak in Argentina – what you need to know about psittacosis

The term “mysterious pneumonia” has become particularly triggering since early 2020. This is how the yet-to-be-named disease COVID-19 was first...

yesterday 4

The Conversation

Michael Head

Ukraine war: $60 billion in US military aid a major morale boost but no certain path to victory

It took months of delays and desperate pleas from Ukraine, but the US House of Representatives has finally passed a bill authorising US$60 billion...

yesterday 2

The Conversation

Stefan Wolff

Georgia is sliding towards autocracy after government moves to force through bill on ‘foreign agents’

Georgia’s ruling party attempted to pass a controversial bill on “foreign agents” in March 2023. The law would have required civil society...

yesterday 1

The Conversation

Natasha Lindstaedt

The language of insolvency: why getting it wrong can harm struggling firms

Business failures are on the rise in Britain, with several high-profile names lost already this year. But since the 1980s, the UK has made it a...

yesterday 3

The Conversation

John Tribe

Young people in Britain aren’t bad at learning languages – but the school system doesn’t make it easy for them

According to a senior British diplomat, British young people’s poor language skills played a role in the UK’s decision not to stay in the...

yesterday 1

The Conversation

Abigail Parrish

A global plastics treaty is being negotiated in Ottawa this week – here’s the latest

Plastic pollution spans the globe, yet national policies are generally not effective enough, and have so far focused primarily on waste management...

yesterday 3

The Conversation

Antaya March

Ignoring Welsh farmers’ protests is a dangerous move for politicians

Farmers in Wales have been taking to the streets in a series of protests against the sustainable farming scheme (SFS), which the Welsh government...

yesterday 5

The Conversation

Lawrence Mckay

Climate change is depleting deep sea oxygen, but tides are helping to keep the ocean healthy

Without sufficient oxygen to respire properly, fish experience the same problems as high-altitude mountaineers. Even relatively small oxygen...

yesterday 2

The Conversation

Tom Rippeth

Vulture Capitalism: Grace Blakeley’s new book is smart on what has gone wrong since the 1980s

Vulture Capitalism: Corporate Crimes, Backdoor Bailouts and the Death of Freedom is the latest book from the English economic and political...

yesterday 1

The Conversation

Conor O&39Kane

Nasa to overhaul mission returning samples from Mars – here’s why it must and will go ahead

Nasa recently announced that it is seeking new ways to complete the return to Earth of rock cores drilled by the Perseverance Rover in the Jezero...

yesterday 1

The Conversation

John Bridges

Dungeons and Dragons at 50: how the role-playing game may soon be used as a form of therapy

Dungeons and Dragons (D&D) is crossing a new frontier, as the game may soon be used as a form of psychological therapy. Over the last five years, I...

yesterday 4

The Conversation

Sören Henrich

Taylor Swift’s The Tortured Poets Department and the art of melodrama

Taylor Swift album drops have become cultural moments – whether or not you are a fan of her music. Each album in the Swift catalogue seeks to open...

yesterday 3

The Conversation

Samuel Murray

Migraine sufferers in England may soon be able to access preventative drug – here’s how atogepant works

A drug that can help prevent migraines could soon be available on the NHS. Atogepant (brand name: Aquipta) was recently recommended by the National...

yesterday 2

The Conversation

Anna Andreou

Do whales sneeze? The Conversation’s Curious Kids podcast

Welcome to the first ever episode of The Conversation’s Curious Kids, a podcast where kids get answers direct from experts! In this episode,...

previous day 4

The Conversation

Eloise Stevens

Hateful graffiti blights communities and it’s something we need to tackle urgently

Hateful graffiti and other imagery plague communities across the UK, spreading a toxic message of division. Such graffiti targets people based on...

19.04.2024 1

The Conversation

Melanie Morgan

China’s new world order: looking for clues from Xi’s recent meetings with foreign leaders

There is broad consensus that Chinese foreign policy has become more assertive and more centralised in the decade since Xi Jinping has ascended to...

19.04.2024 20

The Conversation

Stefan Wolff

The UK is poorer without Erasmus – it’s time to rejoin the European exchange programme

The United Kingdom’s withdrawal from the Erasmus scheme – a reciprocal exchange process that let UK students study at European universities,...

19.04.2024 10

The Conversation

Sascha Stollhans

The world’s oldest conjoined twins have died – what we know about this rare condition

The world’s oldest conjoined twins, Lori and George Schappell, recently died, aged 62. Doctors predicted that the twins (who were joined at the...

19.04.2024 1

The Conversation

Adam Taylor

Liz Truss: an economist explains what she got wrong (and what she’s actually right about)

Liz Truss’s 49 days as UK prime minister will probably be best remembered for her 2022 “mini budget”. Her plan for £45 billion of unfunded tax...

19.04.2024 1

The Conversation

Renaud Foucart

Five things our research uncovered when we recreated 16th century beer (and barrels)

It’s true that our 16th-century ancestors drank much more than Irish people do today. But why they did so and what their beer was like are...

19.04.2024 2

The Conversation

Susan Flavin

Peter Higgs’ famous particle discovery is now at the heart of strategies to unlock the secrets of the universe

A giant of particle physics, Peter Wade Higgs, passed away at his home in Edinburgh on April 8 2024, having lived to 94 years. His unparalleled...

19.04.2024 1

The Conversation

Martin Bauer

Bitcoin is halving again – what does that mean for the cryptocurrency and the market?

Bitcoin, the largest and most talked about digital asset, has been on a rollercoaster of a ride since its launch in January 2009. With a market...

19.04.2024 1

The Conversation

Andrew Urquhart

The Beautiful Game: a film about the Homelessness World Cup that’s a testament to how football can change lives

The Beautiful Game is a film of second chances — where teams of homeless men and women from around the world find that all roads lead to Rome and...

19.04.2024 5

The Conversation

Grant Jarvie

Donald Trump trial: why it took so long to select a jury and how the process is different to the UK

Twelve jurors have now been selected and sworn in for Donald Trump’s high profile trial in New York, the first criminal trial of a former...

19.04.2024 1

The Conversation

Lee John Curley

Taylor’s clues and Ripley’s secrets – what you should see and listen to this week

This article was first published in our email newsletter Something Good, which every fortnight brings you a summary of the best things to watch,...

19.04.2024 2

The Conversation

Naomi Joseph

Domestic politics will be a key factor in how far things escalate between Israel and Iran

The military standoff between two of the Middle East’s regional powers, Israel and Iran, risks escalating into a wider conflict that could plunge...

19.04.2024 7

The Conversation

Ben Soodavar

Don’t blame Dubai’s freak rain on cloud seeding – the storm was far too big to be human-made

Some years ago, I found myself making my way up the narrow stairs of a Learjet on a sultry runway in a deserted airport near the South Africa-...

19.04.2024 1

The Conversation

Richard Washington

Rhapsody in Blue: celebrating 100 years of Gershwin’s groundbreaking classical-jazz masterpiece

George Gershwin’s 1924 composition Rhapsody in Blue is so timeless that it seems scarcely possible that he composed it 100 years ago. Its...

19.04.2024 5

The Conversation

Robert Taub

Stonehenge may have aligned with the Moon as well as the Sun

When it comes to its connection to the sky, Stonehenge is best known for its solar alignments. Every midsummer’s night tens of thousands of...

19.04.2024 1

The Conversation

Fabio Silva

Three reasons to support environmental defenders

Life for environmental defenders is difficult. Politicians vilify them, courts constrict them, journalists mock them and public hostility towards...

19.04.2024 7

The Conversation

Emily Barritt

Why you shouldn’t be afraid to start running after middle age

As someone who started marathon running in mid-life, I know how many aches and pains (and doubts) you can have if you take on the challenge to...

19.04.2024 1

The Conversation

Alister Hart

Why many policies to lower migration actually increase it

Every spring and summer, when the weather improves, the numbers of people trying to cross the Mediterranean to Europe drastically increase,...

19.04.2024 7

The Conversation

Jessica Hagen-Zanker

An Israeli attack on Iran’s nuclear weapons programme is unlikely – here’s why

Israel’s prime minister, Benjamin Netanyahu, has vowed to retaliate against Iran for the unprecedented aerial assault on April 13. He has made it...

18.04.2024 5

The Conversation

Christoph Bluth

Gaza update: the questionable precision and ethics of Israel’s AI warfare machine

The Israel Defense Forces (IDF) have reportedly been conducting operations in the Beit Hanoun area of the northern Gaza Strip conducting raids on...

18.04.2024 7

The Conversation

Jonathan Este

Crucial building blocks of life on Earth can more easily form in outer space – new research

The origin of life on Earth is still enigmatic, but we are slowly unravelling the steps involved and the necessary ingredients. Scientists believe...

18.04.2024 5

The Conversation

Christian Schroeder

Hard work and happy accidents: why do so many of us prefer ‘difficult’ analogue technology?

I finally locate the legendary Schneiders Buero, a shop selling analogue synthesizers in Berlin’s Kotti neighbourhood. Up two flights of stairs,...

18.04.2024 3

The Conversation

Michael Beverland

How a teenager helped identify a new species of giant marine reptile

It may be difficult to imagine, but the county of Somerset in south-west England was once home to what may have been the largest marine reptiles...

18.04.2024 2

The Conversation

Dean Lomax

London Marathon: how visually impaired people run

In this weekend’s London Marathon, nearly 50,000 runners will hit the capital’s streets in one of the world’s most iconic races. For the...

18.04.2024 5

The Conversation

Jessica Louise Macbeth

Newly uncovered Helen of Troy fresco shows Pompeii’s elite were eager for ancient Greek stories about women

Imagine seeing the face of Helen of Troy staring back at you, from within the ashes of a 2,000-year-old city. But these aren’t the burned walls...

18.04.2024 3

The Conversation

Emily Hauser

Russia and the Taliban: here’s why Putin wants to get closer to Afghanistan’s current rulers

Russia is currently considering taking the Taliban off its list of terrorist organisations, officials have indicated. While no final decision has...

18.04.2024 2

The Conversation

Intigam Mamedov

Snorkelling artists showcase Scotland’s diverse marine life in thought-provoking exhibition

In the vibrant ebb and flow of Glasgow’s Byres Road, a new residency of snorkelling artists shines a light on the hidden deep. Until April 24,...

18.04.2024 3

The Conversation

Chris Mackenzie

Beauty giant Sephora has returned to the UK after nearly 20 years – by betting on AI and gen Z

Sephora, the French multinational retailer of personal care and beauty products, has made a comeback to the UK after an 18-year hiatus. The...

18.04.2024 3

The Conversation

Nisreen Ameen

Scotland is ditching its flagship 2030 climate goal –why legally binding targets really matter

The Scottish government has rescinded its 2030 target of a 75% emissions cut to greenhouse gas emissions, relative to 1990. The target was...

18.04.2024 1

The Conversation

Sam Fankhauser

How India’s economy has fared under ten years of Narendra Modi

More than 960 million Indians will head to the polls in the world’s biggest election between April 19 and early June. The ruling Bharatiya Janata...

18.04.2024 2

The Conversation

Kunal Sen

Sky-high waiting times don’t make people trust the NHS any less – why that’s potentially bad news for Rishi Sunak

The National Health Service (NHS) in England has long enjoyed high levels of popular support and trust. This was heightened during the COVID-19...

18.04.2024 7

The Conversation

Thomas Scotto

Why universities shouldn’t mark down international students for using non-standard English

The English language left its borders of origin in Britain long ago. It has been exported throughout the world through colonisation, travel and...

18.04.2024 7

The Conversation

Alexander Baratta

Friend breakups: why they can sometimes feel as bad as falling out of love

If you’ve ever gone through a friendship breakup you aren’t alone – one study from the US found 86% of teenagers had experienced one. Though we...

18.04.2024 1

The Conversation

Sonja Falck

Illmatic at 30: how Nas invented epistolary rap – and changed the hyper-masculine world of hip hop forever

In 1999, during the opening verse to Hate Me Now, Nas positioned himself as the “most critically acclaimed, Pulitzer prize” winning “thug...

18.04.2024 1

The Conversation

Paul Stephen Adey

Low pay and few contracts make freelance journalism a bleak prospect in 2024

Over the past two decades in the news industry, we’ve witnessed shrinking newsrooms, mass redundancies and the steady decline of regional news on...

18.04.2024 10

The Conversation

Amy Thomas

The legal rule that means even Hugh Grant can’t afford to take his case to trial

Lawyers often tell their clients that “principles cost money”. As actor Hugh Grant’s decision to settle his privacy claim against News Group...

18.04.2024 6

The Conversation

Megan Shirley

How England’s scrapped Sure Start centres boosted the health and education of disadvantaged children

The Sure Start programme was launched in 1999, with centres set up in communities across England to offer support to the most disadvantaged...

18.04.2024 2

The Conversation

Sally Pearse

South Africans tasted the fruits of freedom and then corruption snatched them away – podcast

Five years after his momentous election as South African president, Nelson Mandela stepped down after one term in office in 1999. Thabo Mbeki, his...

18.04.2024 10

The Conversation

Gemma Ware

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