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Why has an Israel-Hamas ceasefire been so elusive? A timeline of key moments in the search for peace

Ever since armed conflict has existed, ceasefires have been thought of as a bridge between war and peace. Consequently, their success has been...

latest 4

The Conversation

Marika Sosnowski

Australia is set to ban live sheep exports. What will this mean for the industry?

This month the federal government announced a plan to ban live sheep exports, set to come into effect from May 1 2028. The announcement coincided...

latest 3

The Conversation

Alan Renwick

Oral retinoids can harm unborn babies. But many women taking them for acne may not be using contraception

Oral retinoids are a type of medicine used to treat severe acne. They’re sold under the brand name Roaccutane, among others. While oral retinoids...

latest 3

The Conversation

Antonia Shand

Ancient DNA from an extinct native duck reveals how far birds flew to make New Zealand home

Ask a bird lover if they have heard of the extinct giant moa or its ancient predator, Haast’s eagle, and the answer will likely be yes. The same...

latest 3

The Conversation

Nic Rawlence

Can you control your image? Gina Rinehart, King Charles and ‘moral portraits’

“She’s no oil painting”. Those were the unkind words of a colleague commenting on the subject of Vincent Namatjira’s acrylic painting, Gina....

friday 20

The Conversation

Roger Benjamin

Threatened species have declined 2% a year since 2000. Nature positive? Far from it.

Our government has great aspirations. It has committed to end extinctions and expand our protected areas to cover 30% of every Australian ecosystem...

friday 30

The Conversation

Megan C Evans

Rugby league in Perth and Papua New Guinea? Here’s what could be next for the NRL

This year the National Rugby League (NRL) opened its season in Las Vegas. It was an audacious move by the league’s ambitious head honcho Peter...

friday 40

The Conversation

Tim Harcourt

The budget has earmarked $8.6 million for live music. Is it enough to save the flailing industry?

Leading music organisations have praised the federal budget for its investment in the live music sector. The budget includes A$8.6 million for a...

friday 40

The Conversation

Catherine Strong

Bridgerton is a progressive fantasy about the past. Do romance readers care about its historical accuracy?

Bridgerton watchers started questioning the show’s historical authenticity (again) even before the third season landed. But does historical...

friday 20

The Conversation

Lisa J. Hackett

Cameras reveal wombat burrows can be safe havens after fire and waterholes after rain

Australia’s unprecedented Black Summer bushfires in 2019–20 created ideal conditions for misinformation to spread, from the insidious to the...

friday 30

The Conversation

Grant Linley

ChatGPT is now better than ever at faking human emotion and behaviour

Earlier this week OpenAI launched GPT-4o (“o” for “omni”), a new version of the artificial intelligence (AI) system powering the popular...

friday 20

The Conversation

Marcel Scharth

There’s $110 million for Indigenous education in the budget. But where’s the evidence it will work?

The 2024 federal budget contains A$110 million for Indigenous education. This includes funding for various different organisations to represent and...

friday 20

The Conversation

Marnee Shay

Menopause can bring increased cholesterol levels and other heart risks. Here’s why and what to do about it

Menopause is a natural biological process that marks the end of a woman’s reproductive years, typically between 45 and 55. As women approach or...

friday 20

The Conversation

Treasure Mcguire

After 180 years, new clues are revealing just how general anaesthesia works in the brain

Over 350 million surgeries are performed globally each year. For most of us, it’s likely at some point in our lives we’ll have to undergo a...

friday 20

The Conversation

Adam D Hines

Nuclear subs are coming to Australia. Now the Coalition wants reactors, too. We’re not ready for it

For decades, Australia has exported uranium – but not used it, other than in the Lucas Heights research reactor. But change is coming. We now face...

friday 50

The Conversation

Ian Lowe

Want to be buried on your own land, at sea or in a forest? A guide to unconventional send-offs

At some point, you or someone else will need to make a decision about your “send-off”. Most Australians die in an institution, such as a hospital...

friday 20

The Conversation

Sandra Van Der Laan

Homo Pentecostus: on queer intimacies, religion, ancestry and the human need for connection

Music pumps; lights pulsate; two sweaty bodies sway together, touching, breathing in each other’s scent. A male body framed by downlight...

friday 20

The Conversation

Jonathan Graffam

At the heart of the budget is the sad truth the economy is weak. That’s one reason inflation will fall

A central focus of this week’s budget is the treasury’s forecast for inflation. By this time next year, inflation is projected to be back within...

friday 20

The Conversation

Aruna Sathanapally

Clean energy slump – why Australia’s renewables revolution is behind schedule, and how to fix it

For years, the electricity sector has been the poster child for emissions cuts in Australia. The sector achieved a stunning 26% drop in emissions...

friday 20

The Conversation

Alison Reeve

Friday essay: ‘me against you’ – Jon Ronson investigates the perpetual outrage of the culture wars

The culture wars are perpetually waged in response to new and imagined threats, but they’ve been around forever. They just keep taking on new...

friday 20

The Conversation

Alexander Howard

We mapped a lost branch of the Nile River – which may be the key to a longstanding mystery of the pyramids

The largest field of pyramids in Egypt – consisting of 31 pyramids built over a millennium, including the famous Great Pyramid at Giza – lies...

friday 20

The Conversation

Timothy J. Ralph

If I’m diagnosed with one cancer, am I likely to get another?

Receiving a cancer diagnosis is life-changing and can cause a range of concerns about ongoing health. Fear of cancer returning is one of the top...

friday 10

The Conversation

Sarah Diepstraten

Denser housing can be greener too – here’s how NZ can build better for biodiversity

Cities across Aotearoa New Zealand are trying to solve a housing crisis, with increasing residential density a key solution. But not everyone is...

friday 10

The Conversation

Yolanda Van Heezik

Grattan on Friday: Peter Dutton’s alternative – lower migration, more homes, and a populist swipe at billionaires

When he was opposition leader, Bill Shorten faced Coalition criticism for attacking “the top end of town”, a phrase he used in his 2019 budget...

16.05.2024 20

The Conversation

Michelle Grattan

It’s time to give Labor’s first term a scorecard – have we actually seen any transformative vision?

This week’s budget was Treasurer Jim Chalmers’ third and – for practical purposes – final for the current parliamentary term. Even if the...

16.05.2024 30

The Conversation

John Quiggin

Cumberland Council’s book ban has been overturned, but what is really happening in Australian libraries?

At Cumberland City Council in the western suburbs of Sydney, one man – Councillor Steve Christou – persuaded the council to ban books about...

16.05.2024 20

The Conversation

Lisa M. Given

PrEP was earmarked $26m in the budget. What is it? Will it stop me getting HIV?

HIV prevention was allocated A$43.9 million over three years in this week’s federal budget. Some $26m of this is for “PrEP” for people without...

16.05.2024 20

The Conversation

Bridget Haire

What is PrEP for HIV? Will it stop me getting infected?

HIV prevention was allocated A$43.9 million over three years in this week’s federal budget. Some $26m of this is for “PrEP” for people without...

16.05.2024 30

The Conversation

Bridget Haire

Risk of ‘genetic discrimination’ by insurance companies is ruining people’s trust in vital medical science

Should you be denied life insurance or have to pay extra if you have a genetic risk for certain diseases? Should insurance companies even have...

16.05.2024 20

The Conversation

Brad Elphinstone

Why is New Caledonia on fire? According to local women, the deadly riots are about more than voting rights

New Caledonia’s capital city, Noumea, has endured widespread violent rioting over the past 48 hours. This crisis intensified rapidly, taking...

16.05.2024 30

The Conversation

Nicole George

Sports are supposed to be for all – but new research reveals just how few LGBTQI+ people play sport

The topic of homophobia in sport has recently made headlines in Australia, with a series of homophobic incidents involving men’s AFL players....

16.05.2024 40

The Conversation

Ryan Storr

Investigating social media harm is a good idea, but parliament is about to see how complicated it is to fix

Barely a day has gone by this month without politicians or commentators talking about online harms. There have been multiple high-profile examples...

16.05.2024 7

The Conversation

Rob Nicholls

Popeye’s battle shows how big businesses protect their trademarks – even when they have no plans to come to NZ

At first sight, the battle between a Manawatū fish-and-chip shop and a Louisiana-based chicken joint over the name “Popeye’s” reads like a...

16.05.2024 20

The Conversation

Alexandra Allen-Franks

Choice and control: what can the ACCC do to stop NDIS price gouging and reduce costs?

Many Australians with disability feel on the edge of a precipice right now. Recommendations from the disability royal commission and the NDIS...

16.05.2024 30

The Conversation

Mona Nikidehaghani

What is allyship? A brief history, present and future

Despite social change, LGBTQI people still face discrimination at school and in the community. Language for diverse genders and sexualities is...

16.05.2024 30

The Conversation

Wendy Marie Cumming-Potvin

Postcolonial prophet or advocate of ‘barbaric justice’? A new take on the life and times of influential revolutionary writer Frantz Fanon

Soldier. Psychiatrist. Revolutionary. Writer. More than half a century after his death, Frantz Fanon remains a powerful, polemical figure. Fanon...

16.05.2024 30

The Conversation

Michelle Hamadache

Cancer is increasingly survivable – but it shouldn’t depend on your ability to ‘wrangle’ the health system

One in three of us will develop cancer at some point in our lives. But survival rates have improved to the point that two-thirds of those diagnosed...

16.05.2024 20

The Conversation

Kevin Dew

Floating robots reveal just how much airborne dust fertilises the Southern Ocean – a key climate ‘shock absorber’

The Southern Ocean, a region critical to Earth’s climate, hosts vast blooms of microscopic ocean plants known as phytoplankton. They form the...

16.05.2024 30

The Conversation

Jakob Weis

Like being ‘slapped’ or ‘kicked’: judicial bullying is a problem in Australian courtrooms

Bullying by judges, magistrates and other judicial officers is a factor in many lawyers leaving the profession. This month is the first anniversary...

16.05.2024 30

The Conversation

Ray Nickson

Stirring films made the Snowy scheme a nationbuilding project. Could the troubled Snowy 2.0 do the same?

In 2017, then-Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull alighted from a helicopter to announce a grand plan: Snowy Hydro 2.0. It would turn the famous...

16.05.2024 30

The Conversation

Belinda Smaill

The budget couldn’t include every ‘good idea’ but not boosting JobSeeker and the Youth Allowance were obvious misses

The government says the budget will help people doing it tough. But it has also opted not to increase JobSeeker and Youth Allowance, despite expert...

15.05.2024 30

The Conversation

Cassandra Goldie

Politics with Michelle Grattan: Budget fight looms on Future Made in Australia tax breaks

Treasurer Jim Chalmers on Tuesday handed down his third budget. It had a second successive surplus and sweeteners, including relief on energy...

15.05.2024 30

The Conversation

Michelle Grattan

Funding might change, but Job-ready Graduates stays for now. What does the budget fine print say about higher education?

On one level, the 2024 federal budget brought few big surprises for universities. The two key measures were already announced leading up to May 14:...

15.05.2024 30

The Conversation

Gwilym Croucher

The budget is full of good news, but good news isn’t the same as good management

This year’s budget has “something for everyone”, with very little in the way of cuts and no new taxes. It’s a classic “good news”...

15.05.2024 30

The Conversation

Kate Griffiths

Why is the government proposing caps on international students and how did we get here?

The federal government is due to introduce legislation on Thursday to enable new caps on the number of international student places at educational...

15.05.2024 30

The Conversation

Christopher Ziguras

Symphonie of the Bicycle: on the desire to be great, and the desire to live a life with great meaning

Symphonie of the Bicycle is a tour de force. Actor and writer Hew Parham takes the audience through comic and heartfelt parallel stories about the...

15.05.2024 20

The Conversation

Catherine Campbell

Two-thirds of us support banning pet cats from roaming. A ban would save millions of native animals – and billions of dollars

Australians have more pet cats than ever before – more than 5 million in total. With the growing number, expectations on pet owners are shifting....

15.05.2024 10

The Conversation

Jaana Dielenberg

Curious Kids: why is blood red?

Why is blood red? – Asher, 6 years 11 months, New South Wales What a great question about something in our body, Asher. Blood is inside our body,...

15.05.2024 30

The Conversation

Theresa Larkin

For a ‘future made in Australia’, we need more innovation and diverse people in science and tech

This year’s federal budget is making up for decades of lost time – both in our clean energy transition and in betting on new technological...

15.05.2024 20

The Conversation

Kylie Walker

New Zealanders have had their say on climate adaptation: here’s where we agree and disagree

Adaptation to climate change will challenge New Zealand politically and economically. As such, it becomes a problem of imagination. We will need to...

15.05.2024 30

The Conversation

Raven Cretney

Israel’s invasion of Rafah will not eliminate Hamas or end the war. So, what is Benjamin Netanyahu’s plan?

The Gaza war has now entered its eighth month and a resolution to the conflict still seems far off. Israel claims to have killed 13,000 Hamas...

15.05.2024 40

The Conversation

Ian Parmeter

‘Westralia shall be free!’ How Western Australia’s secessionists stoked British fears the Empire was at risk

Around 90 years ago, two-thirds of Western Australian voters voted in favour of leaving the Commonwealth at a state referendum. This 1933 result...

15.05.2024 40

The Conversation

Benjamin Wilson Mountford

Space junk comes to life in Ceridwen Dovey’s aching and profound tales of fallen astronauts

Ceridwen Dovey’s Only the Astronauts is a book of stories about the fantasies that have caused humans since the 1950s to launch items –...

15.05.2024 30

The Conversation

Tony Hughes-D&39Aeth

Cheaper medicines and a new approach for mental health care. Will the budget make us healthier?

Health was a centrepiece of last year’s budget, based on a new vision for Medicare. This year, there is less health reform, but the budget does...

15.05.2024 30

The Conversation

Peter Breadon

Green industry yes, conservation no: a budget for people, not for nature

Last night’s budget is another missed opportunity to arrest the poor and deteriorating state of the Australian environment. Subsidising green...

15.05.2024 30

The Conversation

Timothy Neal

A student’s visa has been cancelled for links to ‘weapons of mass destruction’. What’s going on with Australian research security?

Over the weekend, Queensland University of Technology PhD student Xiaolong Zhu became national news – and not for a good reason. Zhu is a Chinese...

15.05.2024 30

The Conversation

Brendan Walker-Munro

From Bridgerton to Grey’s Anatomy, Shonda Rhimes is the queen of romance. Here’s how she gets our hearts pounding

Television producer and screenwriter Shonda Rhimes has come a long way since being a scriptwriter for the 2002 film Crossroads. Her production...

15.05.2024 40

The Conversation

Rebecca Trelease

I’m pregnant. Do I need a multivitamin?

Growing a healthy baby relies on getting enough nutrients while pregnant. But rather than following a healthy diet to provide those nutrients,...

15.05.2024 30

The Conversation

Linda Gallo

Budget 2024: Chalmers fights inflation, will it be enough for a rate cut?

Treasurer Jim Chalmers promised an “inflation-fighting and future-making budget” and he has delivered by introducing measures aimed at directly...

14.05.2024 40

The Conversation

John Hawkins

Chalmers is bitten by the giveaway bug in a budget that contains good news for almost everyone

Treasurer Jim Chalmers has been bitten by the giveaway bug. This budget contains not only the well-foreshadowed tax cuts for all taxpayers, but a...

14.05.2024 40

The Conversation

Stephen Bartos

View from The Hill: What the Reserve Bank thinks of Chalmers’ budget will be nearly as important as the voters’ opinion

Jim Chalmers has produced a benign third budget aimed at soothing hard-pressed voters agitated about their high cost of living and punishing...

14.05.2024 30

The Conversation

Michelle Grattan

At a glance: the 2024 federal budget split four ways

Which departments are the biggest winners and losers in this year’s budget? We’ve broken the budget documents down to show you where the money’s...

14.05.2024 40

The Conversation

Erin Cooper-Douglas

Budget 2024: Chalmers is bitten by the giveaway bug in a budget that contains good news for almost everyone

Treasurer Jim Chalmers has been bitten by the giveaway bug. This budget contains not only the well-foreshadowed tax cuts for all taxpayers, but a...

14.05.2024 40

The Conversation

Stephen Bartos

Relief on energy bills for all in a federal budget that bets on lower inflation

A $300 energy rebate for all households from July 1 and a 10% increase in Commonwealth Rent Assistance are key measures in a budget targeting...

14.05.2024 30

The Conversation

Michelle Grattan

Budget 2024: As Chalmers fights inflation, will it be enough for a rate cut?

Treasurer Jim Chalmers promised an “inflation-fighting and future-making budget” and he has delivered by introducing measures aimed at directly...

14.05.2024 8

The Conversation

John Hawkins

What the Reserve Bank thinks of Chalmers’ budget will be nearly as important as the voters’ opinion

Jim Chalmers has produced a benign third budget aimed at soothing hard-pressed voters agitated about their high cost of living and punishing...

14.05.2024 9

The Conversation

Michelle Grattan

David McBride goes to prison – and Australian democracy takes a hit

Governments and their agencies wield awesome power. At times, it is quite literally the power over life and death. That is why in any functioning...

14.05.2024 50

The Conversation

Peter Greste

Longer appointments are just the start of tackling the gender pain gap. Here are 4 more things we can do

Ahead of today’s federal budget, health minister Mark Butler last week announced an investment of A$49.1 million to help women with endometriosis...

14.05.2024 40

The Conversation

Michelle O&39Shea

An NRL player died at training due to exertional heat stroke. What is it and what should coaches and athletes know?

The tragic death of Manly rugby league player Keith Titmuss in 2020 due to exertional heat stroke is a reminder of the life-threatening nature of...

14.05.2024 2

The Conversation

Samuel Chalmers

Influence, authority and power: how elite women played a crucial role in the Italian Wars of the 16th century

Wartime has often presented opportunities for women to step into leadership roles denied them in peacetime. The Italian Wars, a series of military...

14.05.2024 60

The Conversation

Susan Broomhall

‘Who brings a laptop with her to the hospital to give birth?’ – Leslie Jamison interrogates motherhood, ambition and divorce

The first words of Leslie Jamison’s memoir, which opens in the throes of new motherhood, are “the baby”. But while Splinters is a homage to the...

14.05.2024 10

The Conversation

Astrid Edwards

Some say the Treaty of Waitangi divides NZ – a new survey suggests the opposite is true

The stories Aotearoa New Zealand tells itself about the history of Te Tiriti o Waitangi/the Treaty of Waitangi have evolved considerably over time....

14.05.2024 30

The Conversation

Olli Hellmann

Why are auroras so hard to predict? And when can we expect more?

On Saturday evening before Mother’s Day, Australians witnessed a rare celestial spectacle: a breathtaking display of aurora australis, also known...

14.05.2024 30

The Conversation

Brett Carter

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