Israel’s caretaker government on Sunday approved allocating NIS 3.5 million ($1 million) toward recording video testimonies of Holocaust survivors for future generations.

The funding will go toward creating recordings of survivors from Israel and around the world.

The campaign is seen as an important measure for preserving the memory of the Holocaust, considering the dwindling numbers of survivors and their advancing age.

The effort is also seen as a countermeasure to Holocaust denial around the world.

The gathered material will be digitized and then used online, primarily on social media, in an effort to make Holocaust education more accessible to younger generations, according to a statement from the government.

The testimonies will also be integrated into the education system in Israel and potentially in other countries.

“Our government has led multiple efforts to benefit Holocaust survivors and to continue preserving the memory of the Holocaust for future generations,” Prime Minister Yair Lapid said.

“I’m moved and proud that today we passed this important decision to document the stories of Holocaust survivors from Israel and around the world — a decision that will make a mark for generations to come.”

He thanked Social Equality Minister Meirav Cohen “for her intensive work on this decision… for the welfare of Holocaust survivors.”

“I am proud to be a member of a government that approved such an important decision,” said Cohen.

“The average age of survivors is 86, and in fact, we have only a few years left to improve the quality of the lives of the survivors, and secondly to gather as much evidence as possible to be immortalized for the benefit of future generations,” she added.

Various studies from recent years have indicated that Holocaust awareness is dwindling among younger generations.

A survey published in 2020 by the Claims Conference, which represents Jews seeking compensation for the Holocaust, found that 63 percent of young Americans and 60% of New Yorkers did not know six million Jews were murdered in the Nazi genocide. In New York, 58% could not name a single concentration camp, 19% believed Jews caused the Holocaust and 43% did not know what Auschwitz was.

Education experts have repeatedly said new teaching methods will be required in order to reach out to younger generations and keep the memory of the Holocaust alive as the years go by and firsthand testimonies are harder to come by.

Luke Tress contributed to this report.

I joined The Times of Israel after many years covering US and Israeli politics for Hebrew news outlets.

I believe responsible coverage of Israeli politicians means presenting a 360 degree view of their words and deeds – not only conveying what occurs, but also what that means in the broader context of Israeli society and the region.

That’s hard to do because you can rarely take politicians at face value – you must go the extra mile to present full context and try to overcome your own biases.

I’m proud of our work that tells the story of Israeli politics straight and comprehensively. I believe Israel is stronger and more democratic when professional journalists do that tough job well.

Your support for our work by joining The Times of Israel Community helps ensure we can continue to do so.

Thank you,
Tal Schneider, Political Correspondent

We’re really pleased that you’ve read X Times of Israel articles in the past month.

That’s why we started the Times of Israel ten years ago - to provide discerning readers like you with must-read coverage of Israel and the Jewish world.

So now we have a request. Unlike other news outlets, we haven’t put up a paywall. But as the journalism we do is costly, we invite readers for whom The Times of Israel has become important to help support our work by joining The Times of Israel Community.

For as little as $6 a month you can help support our quality journalism while enjoying The Times of Israel AD-FREE, as well as accessing exclusive content available only to Times of Israel Community members.

Thank you,
David Horovitz, Founding Editor of The Times of Israel

QOSHE - Government approves funds to record Holocaust survivors’ testimonies for the future - Tobias Siegal
We use cookies to provide some features and experiences in QOSHE

More information  .  Close
Aa Aa Aa
- A +

Government approves funds to record Holocaust survivors’ testimonies for the future

15 4 0
20.11.2022

Israel’s caretaker government on Sunday approved allocating NIS 3.5 million ($1 million) toward recording video testimonies of Holocaust survivors for future generations.

The funding will go toward creating recordings of survivors from Israel and around the world.

The campaign is seen as an important measure for preserving the memory of the Holocaust, considering the dwindling numbers of survivors and their advancing age.

The effort is also seen as a countermeasure to Holocaust denial around the world.

The gathered material will be digitized and then used online, primarily on social media, in an effort to make Holocaust education more accessible to younger generations, according to a statement from the government.

The testimonies will also be integrated into the education system in Israel and potentially in other countries.

“Our government has led multiple efforts to benefit Holocaust survivors and to continue preserving the memory of the Holocaust for future generations,” Prime Minister Yair Lapid said.

“I’m moved and proud........

© The Times of Israel


Get it on Google Play