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Ancient and Unique Uzbekistan: Tashkent II

16 0 3
08.12.2021

You can walk around Tashkent endlessly, constantly finding here and there, unexplored corners.

For example, have you heard that in 1865, a military fortress was built on the left bank of the Ankhor, not far from the Kaymas Gate? It was possible to get into it, surrounded by a high earthen rampart with fragments of brick walls, through three gates. The main ones, eastern and the most beautiful, have survived to this day and are one of the tourist attractions of the capital. The Kaymas Gate. This photo is courtesy of the Press Service of the Tashkent Region Tourism and Sports Department.

In the 70s of the last century, on the territory of the former fortress, the Pioneer Park with attractions and a cinema appeared. Walking here, children always climbed the preserved gate.

The building of the Central Committee of the Communist Party of Uzbekistan was built on the rampart from the side of Uzbekistan Avenue (now named after Islam Karimov), now the presidential administration works in it. Experts attribute this building to the monuments of Soviet modernism. In the 1960s, beautiful cascades of waterfalls were built next to it, to which access was opened several years ago.

In the nineties, Oqsaroy, the residence of the first president, was built on the territory of the former fortress on the site of the park. Now it is the Scientific and Educational Complex of Islam Karimov, where visitors can see a photographic exposition and paintings dedicated to the first president, stroll through a beautiful garden and photograph the very eastern gate.

By the way, you can approach them from the outside, passing between nine-story buildings overlooking the boulevard, popularly called The Blue Domes.

Looking at the gate, we forget about their military purpose. It is beautiful with its curly brickwork, characteristic of the buildings of “Russian Turkestan”, giving them a fabulous look.

The history of Uzbekistan reads many events: the seizure of lands, bloody feuds, the fall, and the growth of states, but one thing remains unchanged – the memory about the people who became victims of their time. Museum of Remembrance of the Victims of Repression. This photo is courtesy of the Press Service of the Tashkent Region Tourism and Sports Department.

You can learn about those who will forever remain in the memory of the people in the unique Museum of Remembrance of the Victims of Repression. Advertisement

The main entrance of the Museum of Remembrance of the Victims of Repression. This photo is courtesy of the Press Service of the Tashkent Region Tourism and Sports Department.

The museum was created in November 2002 to tell the modern generation about the ancestors who called the nation for freedom and became victims of massive political repression during the period of the totalitarian regime. The park of the Shahidlar Hiyoboni (“Alley of victims”) complex. This photo is courtesy of the Press Service of the Tashkent Region Tourism and Sports Department.

The museum is an adornment of the Shahidlar Hiyoboni (“Alley of victims”) park located in the Yunusabad district of Tashkent. Shahidlar Hiyoboni memorial complex. This photo is courtesy of the Press Service of the Tashkent Region Tourism and Sports Department.

On one of the central squares of Tashkent, Bunyodkor Square, a monument is erected in memory of the Shamakhmudov family. This monument serves as a reminder that feats are performed by ordinary people in difficult circumstances. The Shamakhmudov Family memorial monument. This photo is courtesy of the Press Service of the Tashkent Region Tourism and Sports Department.

The monument was unveiled in May 1982 on the square that previously had the symbolic name of........

© The Times of Israel (Blogs)


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