Let’s be honest, Jew or Christian, black or white, LGBTQ or a woman or man, most Americans intending to vote in the November elections have decided who they are voting for.

Unless a world war, a stock market crash or a series of natural disasters changes the minds of voters overnight, most of us can vote today. I know who I am voting for. I am sure you know who you are voting for too.

The question from leaders in both political parties concerns Jews voting as a block. Can they depend on Jewish donor money and votes?

What Should American Jews Focus On When They Vote?

The answer should be simple, but it’s not. Voting for Jews is as complicated as deciding which shul to attend on Yom Kippur. Jews in America should vote like every other minority group. They should focus on issues that affect their lives every single day.

I bet the answers are similar among the most liberal Democrats and most conservative Republicans, even if they don’t admit it publicly. That is the problem.

Then, there is the alarming threat of antisemitism and the elimination of Israel. That is the most aggravating. With all the Jewish leadership in politics, business, media and education, why is antisemitism so prevalent in our lives everyday?

We have a chance to unite and take the first steps to stamp out antisemitism in the political system on November 8th. Here is how:

If we work together, regardless of party or religious affiliation, wherever you live and if you agree or disagree with me, these common sense tips will work—if you vote! Advertisement

Get Out The Vote

Staying home is not an option. You might not like the choices among the candidates. You are sick of the endless emails, texts, phone calls and mailing delivered daily through the postal service. You don’t want to be asked to contribute. You are tired of trying to watch a television show filled with commercials sponsored by groups you never heard of. However, you must “hold your nose” and get out and vote. You have no excuses. You have endless choices of early voting in person, voting on Election Day, November 8th or requesting an absentee voting ballot by mail.

If you find excuses not to vote, then you won’t vote. If you don’t like the outcome, you have nothing to complain about. You could be part of the problem. While other minority groups are mobilizing in record numbers, are Jews getting together to vote?

It’s no secret that I am a Republican. However, I believe in a checks and balances systems in both parties.

I am a proud American Jew. I believe in the American Dream. I hope that my dream, similar to European Jews before the Holocaust doesn’t meet the same fate.

QOSHE - The Jewess Patriot: Are American Jews Ready To Vote? - Cindy Grosz
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The Jewess Patriot: Are American Jews Ready To Vote?

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02.10.2022

Let’s be honest, Jew or Christian, black or white, LGBTQ or a woman or man, most Americans intending to vote in the November elections have decided who they are voting for.

Unless a world war, a stock market crash or a series of natural disasters changes the minds of voters overnight, most of us can vote today. I know who I am voting for. I am sure you know who you are voting for too.

The question from leaders in both political parties concerns Jews voting as a block. Can they depend on Jewish donor money and votes?

What Should American Jews Focus On When They Vote?

The answer should be simple, but it’s not. Voting for Jews is as complicated as deciding which shul to attend on Yom Kippur. Jews in America should vote like every other minority group. They should focus on issues that affect their lives every single day.

  • Are you financially better off than you were two years ago?
  • Do you feel safe walking on the streets in your neighborhood or parking your car overnight in driveways and local........

    © The Times of Israel (Blogs)


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