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Expanding Democracy is important for Israel’s fight against climate change

18 2 0
26.11.2021

Last week’s return to Israel from Turkey of the couple held for taking a selfie with President Erdogan’s palace highlighted an important trend that may determine which countries succeed, and which fail, during the era of climate chaos: the contraction of democracy.

Turkey, a once proud democracy and European Union aspirant, pulled from the autocrat’s handbook to turn a tempest in a teapot into a rally-around-the-flag operation. Israel, on the other hand, a country renewed in its democratic spirit, returned to normalcy in its response to such saber rattling, as Maariv’s Ben Caspit wrote. All in a week when the 2021 Global State of Democracy report declared the US is backsliding in its commitment to democracy, alongside nations such as Myanmar and Afghanistan.

Even as Israel may have avoided its own Erdogan’s attempts to capture lifelong power, our public sector is notoriously difficult to interact with, to work alongside, and to communicate with. This is a threat to our democracy we need to address. In an era when our very assumptions for business as usual are challenged by a collapsing climate, the backsliding of democracy is especially dangerous. When the times are a’changing, the more diversity in voices that can contribute to the conversation, that can raise issues and suggest solutions, the better. We need to build a new model for public-government interaction that benefits from our public’s diversity of expertise and enables the contribution of that expertise in between elections, to enable fluid course corrections during the chaotic period caused by rapid climate changes in the years ahead.

We need to build a new model for public-government interaction that benefits from our public’s diversity of expertise and enables the contribution of that expertise in between elections, to enable fluid course corrections during the chaotic period caused by rapid climate changes in the years ahead

Autocracies, when well run, are generally very successful at organizing national resources and directing them towards long-term strategic plans. China here is the case in point. On the other hand, they are generally bad at responding to rapidly changing circumstances. The reason autocracies generally fail as the world shifts is because the same discipline and penchant for following orders overwhelms their mechanisms of control. The diet of fear required to keep a........

© The Times of Israel (Blogs)


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