Before I entered the world in 1947, Carl Hubbell succeeded and retired from Major League Baseball. He stated, “A fellow doesn’t last long on what he has done. He’s got to keep on delivering as he goes along.” This expresses the idea that relying solely on past achievements isn’t enough; one must continue to perform and deliver consistently to maintain receding success. He did. I don’t. I’m not consistent as an opinion writer because sometimes my mind goes blank. I’m on the right path or road going in the right direction, although I’ve become stagnant. My old friend Will Rogers, who never met a man he didn’t like, reminds me “Even if you’re on the right track, you’ll get run over if you just sit there.”

In spite of a sea of information, I’m perplexed and unsettled to come up with new ideas to write about. I mean one can write about anything, but whatever it may be, does it outshine previous topics? More importantly, is it engaging and compelling for the audience of readers? Does the content meet their needs or is it just noise? My niche may not captivate many. To discover the niche of the audience is what is important. Generally, I write about everything under the sun, staying clear of politics, sports and economics for the most part. Experts and others do a much better job with those topics than myself.

Today I give you this: “doomscrolling” a.k.a doomsurfing of daunting stories, many of which are started by and sent by trolling behavior. From the Mayo Clinic Press, psychologist Dr. Craig N. Sawchuk states that doomscrolling has become a mental health issue. This age of internet and social media bombardment has given rise to the phenomenon which is a flood of endless copious discouraging posts and negative information that one follows. The phenomenon starts with one attempting to become more aware of something.

According to Sawchuk’s insights, our brains are hardwired to orient us toward novelty and threat. “A brain that noticed threats — especially novel threats — was a brain that got you out of harm’s way before it was too late.”

When the scrolling becomes obsessive and unproductive carrying you from one outrageous story to another that causes you to feel worse about the human race and what humans do, then, it becomes a mental health issue. For example, I try to avoid any news about North Korea; it depresses me because I cannot wrap my head around their government and leaders’ thinking processes.

Now, whether a cat has 6, 7, or 9 lives, the proverb remains: Curiosity killed the cat. Just how much information do we need to know about anything? Does it have value and relevance? I trust you are well-rounded, well-read and well-informed. With minor updates and changes by other sources, the previously presented information on doomscrolling has been rehashed and recycled since its noticeable origin during the 2020 pandemic.

What I write, I must depend upon and rely on editors to consider and decide if it is worthy to put upon readers. Too, if including me in the length of their number of hard copy sheets and/or online newspaper, then, they will have uplifted me out of this pall. They will have given me confidence to keep delivering as I trudge along.

The author (wrjones@vsu.edu) published the novella “Beyond Harvard” and teaches English as a second language.

QOSHE - Doomscrolling - William R. Jones
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Doomscrolling

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10.07.2024

Before I entered the world in 1947, Carl Hubbell succeeded and retired from Major League Baseball. He stated, “A fellow doesn’t last long on what he has done. He’s got to keep on delivering as he goes along.” This expresses the idea that relying solely on past achievements isn’t enough; one must continue to perform and deliver consistently to maintain receding success. He did. I don’t. I’m not consistent as an opinion writer because sometimes my mind goes blank. I’m on the right path or road going in the right direction, although I’ve become stagnant. My old friend Will Rogers, who never met a man he didn’t like, reminds me “Even if you’re on the right track, you’ll get run over if you just sit there.”

In spite of a sea of information, I’m perplexed and unsettled to come up with new ideas to write about.........

© The Korea Times


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