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‘Sanctuary Cities For The Unborn’ Gear Up To Fight ACLU Lawsuit

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18.03.2020

The American Civil Liberties Union recently filed a lawsuit on behalf of the Lilith Fund and Texas Equal Access Fund, claiming that new abortion bans instituted in seven small East Texas cities violated their citizens’ constitutional rights. Citizens of the seven tiny communities — Waskom, Naples, Joaquin, Tenaha, Rusk, Gary, and Wells — say they are ready to fight the ACLU in court and are confident their ordinances will be upheld.

Asserting the right to abortion is “protected by the U.S. Constitution,” the ACLU says, “The ordinances’ existence misleads residents of these cities as to whether individuals can in fact exercise their right to access abortion.”

The ACLU also claims that calling the plaintiffs “criminal organizations” deprives them of their due process and “unconstitutionally punishes them through the legislative process, without a trial.”

The director of Right to Life East Texas, Mark Lee Dickson, said the people involved in passing and defending the ordinances are standing their ground. He shared with me some of the statements he’s gathered in his work on the abortion bans.

Rusk City Councilman Martin Holsome had a positive outlook on the litigation. “If you’re not being sued by the ACLU, it’s because you’re already doing exactly what they want you to do — nothing.”

Likewise, Joaquin Mayor Bill Baker said his city is “not going to be intimidated by the ACLU. … Our town, our people, are willing to stand and fight for the unborn.”

While pro-lifers across the country flatly reject the ACLU’s claim that abortion is a constitutional right, the scattershot lawsuit does make a claim that’s at least plausible on its face. The lawsuit alleges the language of the ordinance, which is virtually identical in each of the seven cities as well as five more not named in the suit, is “unconstitutionally vague.”

“‘Operat[ing]........

© The Federalist