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The Worst Case COVID-19 Predictions Turned Out To Be Wrong. So Did the Best Case

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23.06.2021

Coronavirus

Ronald Bailey | 6.22.2021 5:15 PM

"Are we battling an unprecedented pandemic or panicking at a computer generated mirage?" I asked at the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic on March 18, 2020. Back then the Imperial College London epidemiological model's baseline scenario projected that with no changes in individual behaviors and no public health interventions, more than 80 percent of Americans would eventually be infected with novel coronavirus and about 2.2 million would die of the disease. This implies that 0.8 percent of those infected would die of the disease. This is about 8-times worse than the mortality rate from seasonal flu outbreaks.

Spooked by these dire projections, President Donald Trump issued on March 16 his Coronavirus Guidelines for America that urged Americans to "listen to and follow the directions of STATE AND LOCAL AUTHORITIES." Among other things, Trump's guidelines pressed people to "work or engage in schooling FROM HOME whenever possible" and "AVOID SOCIAL GATHERINGS in groups of more than 10 people." The guidelines exhorted Americans to "AVOID DISCRETIONARY TRAVEL, shopping trips and social visits," and that "in states with evidence of community transmission, bars, restaurants, food courts, gyms, and other indoor and outdoor venues where people congregate should be closed."

Let's take a moment to recognize just how blindly through the early stages of the pandemic we—definitely including our public health officials—were all flying at the time. The guidelines advised people to frequently wash their hands, disinfect surfaces, and avoid touching their faces. Basically, these were the sort of precautions typically recommended for influenza outbreaks. On July 9, 2020, an open letter from 239 researchers begged the World Health Organization and other public health authorities to recognize that COVID-19 was chiefly spread by airborne transmission rather than via droplets deposited on surfaces. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) didn't update its guidance on COVID-19 airborne transmission until May 2021. And it turns out that touching surfaces is........

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