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House Votes To Make Your Daughters Eligible for the Military Draft

1 32 11
24.09.2021

Military Draft

Matt Welch | 9.24.2021 2:04 PM

Thursday night, because Washington is no longer serious about rudimentary governance, the House of Representatives took what will likely be the decisive legislative step of expanding mandatory age-18 Selective Service registration to include women.

The House voted 316–113 on the "must-pass" annual National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA), which at $778 billion this year gave President Joe Biden $24 billion more than he asked for. The up-or-down passage came after consideration of a series of amendments, from requiring congressional approval for troop deployment in Syria (which failed, 141–286), to allowing cannabis-related companies in legal-marijuana states to obtain banking services (which passed by voice vote).

Amazingly if not quite surprisingly, the effective doubling of the federal government's claim on the lives of American 18-year-olds was never submitted to a standalone vote on the House floor, because Democratic leadership refused to allow it. The Senate's version of the NDAA, which is expected to be voted on next month, already includes mandatory draft registration for women. So unless that changes in the amendment process, potential lady-conscription will be sitting on the desk of a willing Biden this fall.

"Under no circumstances will I support a NDAA that requires my daughter—and thousands of other young women—to register for the draft," Rep. Chip Roy (R–Texas), a member of the draft expansion–opposing House Freedom Caucus, said in a statement after Thursday's vote.

But Roy was outnumbered in his own party. "The NDAA is never perfect, and this is the case where the good far outweighs the bad," Rep. Jim Banks (R–Ind.), chairman of the Republican Study Committee, told the Washington Examiner, in a concise encapsulation of how "must-pass" bills enable questionable lawmaking.

The........

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