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Wake up Britain! If we don't rouse from our lockdown torpor soon, we face an economic apocalypse

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04.06.2020

Even now, when the lockdown is beginning to ease, it is an eerie experience to walk down your local High Street.

Most shops are still shuttered. The restaurants are dark, the pubs abandoned. The dusty pavements stretch out in front of you, silent and empty, weeds poking through the cracks.

Sometimes I feel as if I’ve woken up in a post-apocalyptic science fiction film, with zombies poised to leap out at any moment.

And in one sense, the word apocalyptic is right: with every passing day, it is becoming much harder to rebuild our economy from the ruins.

it is an eerie experience to walk down your local High Street. Most shops are still shuttered. The restaurants are dark, the pubs abandoned. The dusty pavements stretch out in front of you, silent and empty, weeds poking through the cracks. Pictured: Shoppers walk through Liscard in Wallasey, in the Metropolitan Borough of Wirral, Merseyside on Monday

Despite this bleak picture, any talk of relaxing the lockdown remains enormously controversial. Millions of children remain at home, kept there by anxious parents or because schools have not re-opened.

Equally, millions of adults are reluctant to return to work.

Yet, thanks to the definitive figures released by Public Health England (PHE) on Monday, we know that not everybody is equally at risk from this dreadful virus.

We now know, for example, that death rates are twice as high among people of Bangladeshi heritage than among their white neighbours.

We know that death rates are 56 per cent higher among the morbidly obese, that almost half of all victims had underlying heart conditions and that a quarter had dementia.

The latest Downing Street data showed that the UK death toll now stands at 39,728, an increase on yesterday of 359

We also know that if you’re in your 60s, you are 27 times more likely to die than if you’re under 40, with death rates climbing steeply among people in their 70s and 80s.

Given these findings, I wonder why politicians are so reluctant to introduce more flexibility into the lockdown, especially as the death toll falls.

And indeed why are so many — employers and employees — still dithering over resuming work?

Of course........

© Mail Online


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