Internet or the cyberspace is now the habitat of new-age terrorists. It’s becoming immensely difficult for the governments and regulators to ensure cyber security due to threats from emerging technologies. The United Nations Security Council’s Counter-Terrorism Committee (UN CTC) on October 29 adopted the Delhi Declaration and called on its 15 member states to ensure zero tolerance towards terrorism of all kinds. As the chair of the Counter-Terrorism Committee, India was the first country to host a special two-day meeting of the United Nations Security Council’s Counter-Terrorism Committee session outside the UN SC secretariat on October 28 and 29. The first session of the special meeting of Counter-Terrorism Committee was convened in Mumbai on October 28 and the second meeting was held in New Delhi on next day on October 29.

Addressing at the plenary session of the special meeting on October 29, India’s External Affairs Minister remarked that terrorists as well as terror sympathizers have misused advanced technologies like block-chain, virtual private networks , and encrypted messaging services such as WhatsApp for terror activities. The social media and internet platforms are becoming a “toolkit of terrorist groups” for spreading propaganda, radicalisation and conspiracy, remarked Dr S Jaishankar. India during the session announced that it would contribute half a million dollars to the UN Trust Fund for Counter Terrorism this year to augment the efforts in providing capacity-building support to member states in preventing and countering the threat of terrorism.

Speaking at the meeting, Dr Jaishankar said, “The new and emerging technologies – from virtual private networks, and encrypted messaging services to blockchain and virtual currencies – offer a very promising future for a wide array of economic and social benefits for humankind. However, there is a flip side, especially where terrorism is concerned.”

Shirley Ayorkor Botchwey, Foreign Minister of Ghana, Reem Ebrahim Al Hashimy, Minister of State for International Cooperation of UAE, and Megi Fino, Deputy Foreign Minister of Albania. Senior officials of the United Nations, including Mr Vladimir Voronkov, Under Secretary General, United Nations Office for Counter Terrorism attended the CTC meeting in India. Gabon was the President of the UN Security Council for the month of October. On the sidelines of the meeting, India’s External Affairs Minister Dr. S Jaishankar met Michael Moussa-Adamo, Foreign Minister of Gabon and Shirley A. Botchwey, Foreign Minister of Ghana. During the first session in Mumbai, India played an audio clip of the most wanted Pakistan based terrorist Sajid Mir, who was in constant touch with and gave instructions to the attackers of Mumbai attack or tragic 26/11 attack in 2008.

UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres urged for international efforts to deal with the challenge of the use of new technologies by various terror groups.

“Terrorists and others posing hateful ideologies are abusing new and emerging technologies to spread disinformation, foment discord, recruit and radicalise

, mobilise resources and execute attacks,” Antonio Guterres’s message said, which was read out during the CTC special meeting.

The special meeting will have impacts in the coming days, not just it’s being held in an emerging Asian state but the CTC has taken few new initiatives to curb terror. The special meeting of the council ended with the adoption of the Delhi Declaration. It firmly stated that terrorism shoud not be linked with any religion, nationality, civilization or ethnic group. According to Delhi Declaration, the CTC will prepare recommendations to counter the terrorist exploitation of Information and Communications Technology, including payment technologies and fundraising methods and misuse of unmanned aerial systems. The council will develop counter-terrorist narratives and innovative technological solutions.

As the technologies are advancing, terrorists are taking advantages of them. Easy availability of drones or cryptocurrencies is blessing for terror groups. The world needs a more well-coordinated and strategised response to these challenges The civil society and private enterprises should have a credible role in the fight against terrorism. The digital literacy should be included in the plan of actions of the states in order to curb cyber terrorism. Monitoring cyberspace is essential so is the civil rights in every geography and every society. Safety of cyberspace should not be compromised. The UN CTC’s special meeting in India is a significant step to counter terrorism and blocking their methods of financing. Afghanistan and South Asia have reasons to cheer.

Ayanangsha Maitra is a freelance journalist and PhD researcher. He writes for Khaama Press from India and tweets @Ayanangsha.

View all posts

QOSHE - Curbing Terror: UN Counter-Terrorism Meeting in India - Ayanangsha Maitra
We use cookies to provide some features and experiences in QOSHE

More information  .  Close
Aa Aa Aa
- A +

Curbing Terror: UN Counter-Terrorism Meeting in India

21 3 7
02.11.2022

Internet or the cyberspace is now the habitat of new-age terrorists. It’s becoming immensely difficult for the governments and regulators to ensure cyber security due to threats from emerging technologies. The United Nations Security Council’s Counter-Terrorism Committee (UN CTC) on October 29 adopted the Delhi Declaration and called on its 15 member states to ensure zero tolerance towards terrorism of all kinds. As the chair of the Counter-Terrorism Committee, India was the first country to host a special two-day meeting of the United Nations Security Council’s Counter-Terrorism Committee session outside the UN SC secretariat on October 28 and 29. The first session of the special meeting of Counter-Terrorism Committee was convened in Mumbai on October 28 and the second meeting was held in New Delhi on next day on October 29.

Addressing at the plenary session of the special meeting on October 29, India’s External Affairs Minister remarked that terrorists as well as terror sympathizers have misused advanced technologies like block-chain, virtual private networks , and encrypted messaging services such as WhatsApp for terror activities. The social media and internet platforms are becoming a “toolkit of........

© Khaama Press


Get it on Google Play