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Why Modi does not want Peace in Afghanistan?

37 24 0
26.12.2019

The Modi government’s approach to the transition in Afghanistan bears an uncanny resemblance to the situation thirty years ago, in end-1989.

A great power that intervened in Afghanistan was retreating after a bloody conflict that lasted a decade and was washing its hands off its client state; the puppet regime in Kabul was hanging over the abyss; anarchy was let loose in the country; the enemy was at the gates. With an eye on Pakistan, Delhi considered it a matter of realpolitik to offer a lifeline to the Najibullah regime.

That was the context in which then PM Rajiv Gandhi made his famous phone call to the beleaguered Afghan President Najibullah, inviting him to visit India.

In a strikingly similar context, PM Modi made a phone call on December 24 to the incumbent Afghan President Ashraf Ghani to come to India, his ‘second home’.

We note the release of preliminary results and thank the IEC commissioners and staff for their dedicated, patriotic service to the Afghan people and the Islamic Republic

We note the release of preliminary results and thank the IEC commissioners and staff for their dedicated, patriotic service to the Afghan people and the Islamic Republic

Of course, Najib was delighted. The Afghans assumed that Delhi was stepping in to fill the void that the Soviets were leaving behind. The ruling elite in Kabul assessed that Delhi was determined to prevent the regime’s fall lest it led to takeover by Pakistan-friendly forces.

However, as it happened, the story ended in a way no one had foreseen. Delhi had no intentions to bankroll Najib’s government. Simply put, the thought had never occurred to the Indian leadership, which was grappling with a crisis in the economy (as at present.)

The Afghans understood eventually that........

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