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Hindutva extremist ideology made it a pariah in world’s opinion

19 1 0
24.12.2019

This has been an extraordinary period in India’s equations with the international community. The mass agitation against the Modi-Amit Shah plan of action to impose the Citizenship Amendment Act (CAA) and its follow-up, the National Register of Citizens (NRC), have caught world attention.

The international community is shell-shocked over India’s degeneration into authoritarian rule under Modi’s watch in such a short period of time. Western writers are seeking clues from Modi’s political career to put in perspective current events in India.

When a democratically-elected government shoots down dissenting citizens in cold blood and moves on nonchalantly, it causes a sense of revulsion in the civilised world. The outside world — Muslim World and the Christian world alike — tend to view the CAA and NRC as patently ‘anti-Muslim’.

Ambedkar explained that the history of India before the Muslim invasions is the history of a mortal conflict between Brahmanism and Buddhism

Ambedkar explained that the history of India before the Muslim invasions is the history of a mortal conflict between Brahmanism and Buddhism

However, it is the reaction of the Christian world that is particularly galling for the Hindu fundamentalists who had the delusional hope that ‘Islamophobia’ was a common platform with the Christian world.

Lacking erudition and world view, it is beyond the comprehension of the Modi Bhakts to understand the complexities of the acrimony amongst Abrahamic religions— Judaism, Christianity and Islam — which has historical roots and is more like a family quarrel laden with overlapping passions of likes and dislikes, rapport and aversion, desires and insouciance.

Furthermore, despite the shibboleth being propagated by the Hindu fundamentalists, the fact remains that Hinduism as a ‘religion’, unlike the ancient Abrahamic religions, is of recent origin — as recent, arguably, as British India........

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