After what began as a relatively quiet hurricane season in the Atlantic, the past few weeks have seen the formation of two major storms: Hurricane Fiona, which knocked out the entirety of Puerto Rico’s power grid, and Hurricane Ian. Formed on Friday, Ian is barreling toward Florida after
hitting Cuba on Tuesday, growing as it moves over the warm Gulf. As it makes landfall in southwest Florida on Wednesday, its storm surges and heavy winds in low-lying, high-population areas could make it one of the worst hurricanes to hit the U.S. in years. Here’s what we know so far about the Category 4 hurricane making its way to the Florida coast:

NBC News reports that, as of 8 a.m. on Wednesday, Ian’s maximum sustained winds reached 155 mph an hour, just shy of the mark for a Category 5 storm.

In an early morning news conference, Governor Ron DeSantis said the state is expecting the storm to make landfall later in the day in southwest Florida and that several tornado warnings were issued through the night, something he expects to continue through the day. “This is gonna be a nasty nasty day, two days,” he said. “We think now it will be exiting the peninsula sometime on Thursday.”

As the hurricane closes in on the coast, many southwest Florida residents are seeing the shoreline recede as low pressure at the center of the storm draws water in:

We’re on Bayshore Blvd in Tampa & #HurricaneIan has sucked some water out of the bay @abcactionnews pic.twitter.com/K8e0hUcl0q

Eerie sign of the approaching Hurricane Ian: the storm appears to be pulling water away from Tampa Bay shores. Charter captain Jordan Hallsted spotted this scene at 830 am near North Shore Park / Coffeepot Bayou in St. Pete pic.twitter.com/gLFWPmSI63

The Florida Division of Emergency Management has warned residents in Tampa Bay and Charlotte Harbor not to walk out into the temporarily dry harbors, as the water will soon return as a dangerous storm surge. Meanwhile, some swimmers in Fort Meyers are playing in the dangerous waves encroaching on the city. Parts of Fort Meyers Beach are already experiencing a significant storm surge:

This is not good. Parts of Fort Myers Beach are already underwater. A woman who lives on Matanzas Court just sent me this video of her neighborhood. This is right off Estero Blvd. @NBC2 pic.twitter.com/duz05bLtzf

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QOSHE - Hurricane Ian Verges on Category 5 As It Makes Landfall in Florida - Intelligencer Staff
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Hurricane Ian Verges on Category 5 As It Makes Landfall in Florida

2 0 19
28.09.2022

After what began as a relatively quiet hurricane season in the Atlantic, the past few weeks have seen the formation of two major storms: Hurricane Fiona, which knocked out the entirety of Puerto Rico’s power grid, and Hurricane Ian. Formed on Friday, Ian is barreling toward Florida after
hitting Cuba on Tuesday, growing as it moves over the warm Gulf. As it makes landfall in southwest Florida on Wednesday, its storm surges and heavy winds in low-lying, high-population areas could make it one of the worst hurricanes to hit the U.S. in years. Here’s what we know so far about the Category 4 hurricane making........

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