What began as a relatively quiet hurricane season in the Atlantic is quiet no more, after Hurricane Ian slammed into Florida’s Gulf Coast on Wednesday as a Category 4 storm, one of the strongest to make landfall in the U.S. in years. The storm killed dozens of people, mostly across Florida, where residents and authorities are still struggling to pick up the pieces. Below is a look at the storm’s impact thus far, what’s next, and the most stunning footage of the destruction it the storm caused in Florida.

Water rescues continued across Florida on Saturday, where more than 1,100 people have been plucked from the floodwaters since Ian struck midweek. NBC News reports that at least 77 storm-related deaths have been confirmed as of Saturday, almost all in Florida, where still-flooded waterways are hampering recovery efforts. The New York Times reports that at least 35 people have been confirmed dead just in Florida’s Lee County, where Ian made landfall. Lee County was the last county in the region to issue evacuation orders, after local officials apparently assumed, for too long, that the storm would strike further north on the coast as was originally forecast.

The remnants of Ian continue to affect the Carolinas, where the storm knocked out power for some 850,000 customers on Friday, and caused significant coastal flooding, particularly in South Carolina. Four people were killed in North Carolina on Friday mostly in storm-related car accidents.

Vehicles stalled out due to flooding in Charleston, SC #HurricaneIan @ryanhallyall @RadarOmega pic.twitter.com/ib8xPlfEaf

Ian was briefly downgraded to a tropical storm on Thursday after losing steam traveling over Florida. But Thursday night, its winds rose again to the level of a Category 1 hurricane as it traveled over the Atlantic toward South Carolina, where it it made landfall on Friday afternoon, bringing what may be as much as a seven-foot storm surge to the coast north of Charleston.

Part of Pawleys Island pier was destroyed. Part of Cherry Gove pier was destroyed. Now, the very end of Apache Pier has collapsed. Video via Randy Saunders #scwx #ncwx pic.twitter.com/ReUrVrWfuw

Storm surge in Murrells Inlet. Pictures by Norma Coote @EdPiotrowski #Ian #scwx pic.twitter.com/d8T9FfLa8Z

Though the National Hurricane Center forecasts that “rapid weakening” will occur after landfall, a dangerous storm surge of up to seven feet is expected in some coastal areas. The governors of Georgia and North Carolina have declared states of emergency in preparation.

Update: Surface observations indicate that the center of #Hurricane #Ian made landfall on Sep 30 at 205 pm EDT (1805 UTC) near Georgetown, South Carolina with maximum sustained winds of 85 mph (140 km/h) and an
estimated minimum central pressure of 977 mb (28.85 inches). pic.twitter.com/TNk43VBHUG

As of Friday morning, the storm’s cloud coverage ranged from Jacksonville to Pittsburgh to Boston:

Ian: Part II pic.twitter.com/wNOSqLjrcU

The east coast of Florida was struck by some very big waves on Friday afternoon, in part thanks to Ian:

HAPPENING NOW SOUTH BEACH. Incredible video! When a monster king tides merges with noon high tide on #MiamiBeach. Be careful out there. #sealevelrise #climateaction
video via @roshloweWPLG pic.twitter.com/OSzq6dMA5x

The higher than normal astronomical tides but falling tide, nearby water rise from Ian, & the large oceans swells radiating down the Florida coast from Ian, all combing to create a "tidal bore" effect with Government Cut at the edge of the breakwater.https://t.co/Sz2JdtXWl5 pic.twitter.com/m5GcZZtXZc

Longer video - people washed away in #Miami #Florida by #kingtide waves. I’ve sailed and power boated in Government cut, it’s where cruise and cargo boats enter Miami too. Very dangerous situation for those people. pic.twitter.com/4UUOFvDNkB https://t.co/8Gi6ojT2su

Footage emerging from Florida in the wake of major hurricane Ian is absolutely heartbreaking. The scale of the devastation is hard to fathom.

Aerial assessment of Lee County, Southwest Florida by @SheriffLeeFL pic.twitter.com/cToGK7uGyA

I got an aerial tour of Fort Myers beach. Most of it will need to be completely rebuilt. pic.twitter.com/9WgZJdXnfm

Storm surge got into our WINK studios in Fort Myers, flooded the entire first floor. Lost power and was unable to continue broadcasting on tv/radio. No timetable on return to air. #Ian was the strongest hurricane in Southwest Florida history. Widespread destruction heading home. pic.twitter.com/w6is0EXcpD

Drone footage of Pier in Fort Myers Beach #HurricaneIan

Video is not mine pic.twitter.com/1kotJh8zmu

What it looked like before:

Before and after of the Fort Myers Beach Pier pic.twitter.com/rT6zWXjQR4

Fort Myers Beach Times Square LEVELED following #HurricaneIan #Ian #HurricanIan pic.twitter.com/V3gHTs5Mx8

For reference on the above:

Approximate geolocation of a frame in this video from @swmurfl. https://t.co/bdAJtQfL72 pic.twitter.com/USMYJARP2U

Ft Myers Beach is effectively gone, almost no emergency crews yet. These poor people need so much help… pic.twitter.com/5uLo26zFMZ

We’ve lost count of the number of vehicles we’ve seen flooded out, even one flipped over in flood waters near Iona, Florida after #Hurricane #Ian.

Neighbors say more help is desperately needed in this stretch of #SWFL @accuweather pic.twitter.com/QyE8ApFoCT

In Fort Myers:

This video will leave you speechless.

Video was taken in Ft. Myers, Florida after Ian brought flooding, heavy rain, and strong winds to the area.

The City of Fort Myers issued an emergency citywide 48-hour curfew for residents, visitors, and first responders.#Ian #knowbefore pic.twitter.com/bWysRR4MHA

Unbelievable footage from my boss yesterday in Fort Myers, FL. He is in a high rise condo complex off the Caloosahatchee River. Described the building as a “carnival ride” with how the winds were swaying. @JimCantore @MichaelRLowry @MikeMasco @weatherchannel pic.twitter.com/7yf7gNAKs7

We were in the eye wall of Cat. 4 #Hurricane #Ian for over 5 hours and the back side was the worst.
I haven't experienced anything close to this in over 30 years @weatherchannel pic.twitter.com/wfEqcuEBAm

Storm surge went into second floor houses on San Carlos Island. Just left there and interviewed the man who took this video. He punched out a wall to get out of his house — and then used a jet ski to check on neighbors. Several did not survive, he says. #HurricaneIan pic.twitter.com/ocj1HWQhkQ

Houses are destroyed and some are floating away as Ian's eyewall hammers southwest Florida. This is video from Fort Myers Beach, Florida off Estero Blvd by Loni Architects pic.twitter.com/6GqrxLRv9Q

In Naples:

Got this from a friend in #Naples - just so sad. ⁦@ActionNewsJax#Ian pic.twitter.com/HtC0CtG228

In Bonita Springs:

To give people an idea of how horrible Hurricane Ian is in Bonita Springs and the second wall of the hurricane hasn’t hit yet. pic.twitter.com/PvpGuv9QYL

In Placida:

Yesterday was intense! @SimonStormRider and I documented every aspect of Hurricane Ian from the extreme winds in Placida, to getting into the eye, to the storm surge in Ft. Myers. Here is some of our video from ground zero:https://t.co/hIWmJdkblVhttps://t.co/9CUYrUK0dS

By Thursday morning, Hurricane Ian had been downgraded to a tropical storm as it makes its way farther up the East Coast. But in its wake, the storm left immense flooding and millions of Floridians without power.

The Tampa Bay Times reported that a large section of the Sanibel Causeway, which connects Sanibel Island to mainland Florida, had collapsed as a result of the storm.

#BreakingNews: An approximately 50-65 foot section of the Sanibel Causeway Bridge has fallen into the Gulf of Mexico. @NBC2 pic.twitter.com/vOI2EvyVOY

The overnight hours also saw scenes of intense flooding in cities like Naples and Kissimmee.

Extensive flooding in our area remains a serious situation for Kissimmee residents. Shelter in place as first responders continue rescue operations. If you have an emergency, call 9-1-1. pic.twitter.com/RGn0HWzCj0

President Biden approved a disaster declaration for the state of Florida, which will make federal funds available for recovery efforts. Biden also spoke to Governor Ron DeSantis Thursday morning and said he was sending the FEMA administrator to the state tomorrow to “check in on response efforts and see where additional support is needed.”

During a morning press availability, DeSantis said hundreds of people in southwest Florida have called emergency officials for help during the storm, according to the Miami Herald. The governor said that reports on the number of casualties are unconfirmed at this time.

Shortly after 3 p.m. on Wednesday, Ian plowed into Florida near Cayo Costa, Florida with maximum sustained winds registering at 150 mph, according to the National Hurricane Center.

305 PM EDT 28 Sep -- Hurricane #Ian has made landfall as an extremely dangerous Category 4 hurricane near Cayo Costa, Florida with maximum sustained winds at 150 mph. The minimum pressure from Air Force Reconnaissance Hurricane Hunters was 940 mb.

Latest: https://t.co/tnOTyfORCw pic.twitter.com/O3agPDOZHk

Massive storm surges have inundated cities like Naples and Cape Coral, where streets look like rivers. In Fort Myers, emergency alerts have informed residents who stayed that rescues will begin when the storm passes: “This could last all night.”

Naples. Houses are moving pic.twitter.com/nFVY9oP1y4

Cape Coral FL. View from hotel. Wow pic.twitter.com/Sb9FjH89NC

As the sun starts to set over Florida, roughly 1 million residents are without power. National Hurricane Center deputy director Michael Brennan warns that Ian could remain a hurricane for several hours. “Right now we’re expecting it to eventually weaken below hurricane strength sometime overnight tonight or early Thursday morning,” he told CNN on Wednesday. “It’s going to take some time for that circulation to spin down.” Still he says it will remain a “strong tropical storm when it reaches the east coast of Florida.”

While the Tampa Bay area was originally predicted to receive the brunt of the hit, Ian is now bearing down on the Fort Myers area about 130 miles to the south. The metro area, with a population of more than 750,000, is looking at a nine-foot storm surge, dozens of inches of rain, and widespread wind damage.

Modern natural disasters occur at the intersection of natural events and human decisions. A high-end hurricane landfalling near a metro area of 760k that constructed 400+ miles of shallow canals at the wide mouth of a river is certainly an example. pic.twitter.com/iPjhIH9vxw

The Fort Myers metro area has been one of the fastest-growing cities in the U.S. over the past decade, with thousands more residents living in the area than when the last major hurricane struck. Many of its neighborhoods are uniquely susceptible to storm surges:

Modern natural disasters occur at the intersection of natural events and human decisions. A high-end hurricane landfalling near a metro area of 760k that constructed 400+ miles of shallow canals at the wide mouth of a river is certainly an example. pic.twitter.com/iPjhIH9vxw

Large numbers of residents have already evacuated areas in the storm’s path. Governor Ron DeSantis said on Wednesday that people still in Collier, Charlotte, Lee, and Sarasota Counties — some of the hardest-hit areas — should stay in place, as it is now too dangerous to leave.

Hurricane hunters with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration captured stunning images of hurricane’s powerful center. One flight into the storm to collect data nearly crashed after it fell 1,200 feet when it hit the eye wall.

Absolutely wild. All of this in the eye, in which we circled for some time to deploy the UAS (uncrewed aerial system).

A high end Cat 4 storm. Nearly Cat 5.

All of this at 8,000 feet above the ocean. I’m glad we only did one pass. pic.twitter.com/hd2L7icLQY

As the hurricane closed in on the coast, many southwest-Florida residents are seeing the shoreline recede as counterclockwise winds and low pressure at the center of the storm draws water in:

We’re on Bayshore Blvd in Tampa & #HurricaneIan has sucked some water out of the bay @abcactionnews pic.twitter.com/K8e0hUcl0q

Eerie sign of the approaching Hurricane Ian: the storm appears to be pulling water away from Tampa Bay shores. Charter captain Jordan Hallsted spotted this scene at 830 am near North Shore Park / Coffeepot Bayou in St. Pete pic.twitter.com/gLFWPmSI63

The Florida Division of Emergency Management has warned residents in Tampa Bay and Charlotte Harbor not to walk out into the temporarily dry harbors because the water will soon return as a dangerous storm surge. Meanwhile, some swimmers in Fort Myers are playing in the dangerous waves encroaching on the city. Parts of Fort Myers Beach are already experiencing a significant storm surge:

This is not good. Parts of Fort Myers Beach are already underwater. A woman who lives on Matanzas Court just sent me this video of her neighborhood. This is right off Estero Blvd. @NBC2 pic.twitter.com/duz05bLtzf

NBC News reports that as of 8 a.m. on Wednesday, Ian’s maximum sustained winds had reached 155 mph, just shy of the mark for a Category 5 storm. Only four hurricanes on record have ever hit the continental U.S. with higher wind speeds.

In an early-morning news conference, Governor Ron DeSantis said the state is expecting the storm to make landfall later in the day in southwest Florida and that several tornado warnings were issued through the night, something he expects to continue through the day. “This is gonna be a nasty, nasty day, two days,” he said. “We think now it will be exiting the peninsula sometime on Thursday.”

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QOSHE - Hurricane Ian’s Death Toll Continues to Climb - Intelligencer Staff
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Hurricane Ian’s Death Toll Continues to Climb

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02.10.2022

What began as a relatively quiet hurricane season in the Atlantic is quiet no more, after Hurricane Ian slammed into Florida’s Gulf Coast on Wednesday as a Category 4 storm, one of the strongest to make landfall in the U.S. in years. The storm killed dozens of people, mostly across Florida, where residents and authorities are still struggling to pick up the pieces. Below is a look at the storm’s impact thus far, what’s next, and the most stunning footage of the destruction it the storm caused in Florida.

Water rescues continued across Florida on Saturday, where more than 1,100 people have been plucked from the floodwaters since Ian struck midweek. NBC News reports that at least 77 storm-related deaths have been confirmed as of Saturday, almost all in Florida, where still-flooded waterways are hampering recovery efforts. The New York Times reports that at least 35 people have been confirmed dead just in Florida’s Lee County, where Ian made landfall. Lee County was the last county in the region to issue evacuation orders, after local officials apparently assumed, for too long, that the storm would strike further north on the coast as was originally forecast.

The remnants of Ian continue to affect the Carolinas, where the storm knocked out power for some 850,000 customers on Friday, and caused significant coastal flooding, particularly in South Carolina. Four people were killed in North Carolina on Friday mostly in storm-related car accidents.

Vehicles stalled out due to flooding in Charleston, SC #HurricaneIan @ryanhallyall @RadarOmega pic.twitter.com/ib8xPlfEaf

Ian was briefly downgraded to a tropical storm on Thursday after losing steam traveling over Florida. But Thursday night, its winds rose again to the level of a Category 1 hurricane as it traveled over the Atlantic toward South Carolina, where it it made landfall on Friday afternoon, bringing what may be as much as a seven-foot storm surge to the coast north of Charleston.

Part of Pawleys Island pier was destroyed. Part of Cherry Gove pier was destroyed. Now, the very end of Apache Pier has collapsed. Video via Randy Saunders #scwx #ncwx pic.twitter.com/ReUrVrWfuw

Storm surge in Murrells Inlet. Pictures by Norma Coote @EdPiotrowski #Ian #scwx pic.twitter.com/d8T9FfLa8Z

Though the National Hurricane Center forecasts that “rapid weakening” will occur after landfall, a dangerous storm surge of up to seven feet is expected in some coastal areas. The governors of Georgia and North Carolina have declared states of emergency in preparation.

Update: Surface observations indicate that the center of #Hurricane #Ian made landfall on Sep 30 at 205 pm EDT (1805 UTC) near Georgetown, South Carolina with maximum sustained winds of 85 mph (140 km/h) and an
estimated minimum central pressure of 977 mb (28.85 inches). pic.twitter.com/TNk43VBHUG

As of Friday morning, the storm’s cloud coverage ranged from Jacksonville to Pittsburgh to Boston:

Ian: Part II pic.twitter.com/wNOSqLjrcU

The east coast of Florida was struck by some very big waves on Friday afternoon, in part thanks to Ian:

HAPPENING NOW SOUTH BEACH. Incredible video! When a monster king tides merges with noon high tide on #MiamiBeach. Be careful out there. #sealevelrise #climateaction
video via @roshloweWPLG pic.twitter.com/OSzq6dMA5x

The higher than normal astronomical tides but falling tide, nearby water rise from Ian, & the large oceans swells radiating down the Florida coast from Ian, all combing to create a "tidal bore" effect with Government Cut at the edge........

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