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The biggest missed story in history

3 10 0
13.09.2018

So this time it’s Florence — not the city, but the hurricane.

The drumbeat of disaster began when this sea monster was still hundreds of miles from making landfall.

Hurricanes make superstars out of weather presenters. They are ubiquitous in all the pre-disaster coverage of Florence — explaining the finer points of speed, direction, water temperature, storm surges and Formula One level wind gusts.

There were stories in the news about storm chasers who flew airplanes through the eye of the hurricane to gather meteorological data that would help track Florence’s expected path of destruction.

There were interviews with politicians who had reversed the direction of major highways to help millions of people flee low-lying coastal areas in South and North Carolina.

Also interviewed were officials from the Federal Emergency Measures Agency (FEMA), most delivering the same message: something wicked this way comes; get out while you can.

And of course, there was the set television piece with diehards who chose not to evacuate. One man admitted he wanted to stay not merely to protect his property from Florence, whatever that might mean, but also to experience the “thrill” of the storm.

Hearing that, a line from an old Clint Eastwood movie comes to mind: “Dying ain’t much of a living.”

Hurricane Florence is cable news heaven for outfits like CNN.

Their reporters are deployed across the Carolinas like military sentries. At first, they reported in ordinary clothes against the backdrop of serene beaches. But when the winds picked up from the outer bands of this hurricane, and Florence swirled closer to make landfall, they donned their slickers and thermal hats.

In-person storm reporting by news anchors is now a rite of passage in the TV business.

It all began with Dan Rather who rode Hurricane Carla to fame and fortune at CBS back in 1961. Rather put up the first radar shot on live TV of a Category 5 storm making landfall. He later got up close and personal with his........

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