We use cookies to provide some features and experiences in QOSHE

More information  .  Close
Aa Aa Aa
- A +

Why the West shall never win Afghanistan

5 0 0
13.06.2018

The British campaign in Afghanistan, from 2006 onwards, was focused on the province of Helmand. It is the largest province, which covers nine percent of the country’s area, but houses only four percent of the Afghani population. For centuries, armies have marched through Helmand from Iran to India. Unsurprisingly, the capital city of Helmand is called Lashkar Gah (army barracks).

Helmand contains forty percent of the surface water of the country. Opium is the primary crop and Helmand supplies ninety percent of the country’s output. That is one of the reasons why the British focused on the province. The US also sent a third of its forces there.

The mission of the invading armies, euphemistically called the International Security Assistance Force (ISAF), was to ‘wage a counter-insurgency to protect the population.’ However, the plan backfired. As the ISAF started destroying the poppy crop, the farmers felt that their livelihood was being taken away and fought back.

British generals told the locals that they had come there to save them from the terrorists who carried out the 9/11 attacks in the US. However, for the locals, the arrival of the British brought back bad memories of the invasion by the ‘Angrez’ in the 19th century

The British generals told the locals that they had come there to save them from the terrorists who had carried out the 9/11 attacks in the US. But the locals saw the intervention through a different lens. To them, the arrival of the British brought back bad memories of the invasion by the Angrez in the 19th century.

The war in Helmand gets a book-length treatment by Mike Martin in The Intimate........

© Daily Times