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Bill Shorten's biggest challenge is to make himself more likeable

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08.09.2017

In 1996 Paul Keating went into the federal election with 45 per cent of voters preferring him as prime minister over the 40 per cent who preferred opposition leader John Howard. Yet Howard won the election convincingly. The election result in 1996 was strikingly similar to last week's Newspoll that gave the Bill Shorten led ALP 53 per cent of the two-party preferred vote to Malcolm Turnbull's Coalition's 47 per cent.

A quick look at the history of Newspoll's preferred prime minister statistics shows this is not an aberration. John Hewson went to the 1993 poll as preferred prime minister but the incumbent Keating won a handsome victory. In July 2013 Kevin Rudd was preferred by 53 per cent of us compared with the meagre 31 per cent who wanted Tony Abbott. And we all remember how that election, a few months later in September, turned out.

Opposition Leader Bill Shorten has called for a truce on the document wars after releasing documents proving he renounced his British citizenship.

Polls given to Fairfax Media show support for same-sex marriage has crashed ahead of the government's postal survey.

The same sex postal survey is going ahead but there are fresh concerns over hate speech and whether laws are needed to prevent it.

It was mixed emotions for the PM and opposition leader, as news of the High Court's decision on the marriage plebiscite made its way to question time in Canberra.

The High Court rejects the legal challenge to the controversial postal survey six days before ballots are due to be mailed out.

The Turnbull government's postal survey on same-sex marriage will go ahead but those involved in the High Court challenge have vowed to keep campaigning.

The PM has rejected calls to remove the GST from our electricity bills, saying States and Territories will find other ways to make up the shortfall.

Immigration Minister Peter Dutton has pushed through an amendment to section 503A of the Migration Act, which will stop Dustin Martin's father, Shane, from re-entering Australia.

Opposition Leader Bill Shorten has called for a truce on the document wars after releasing documents proving he renounced his British citizenship.

It's stats like these that are consoling some Labor people around Parliament House in Canberra in the light of the big drop in Bill Shorten's preferred prime minister figure (down from 33 to 29 this poll) despite the ALP's 19th consecutive month of........

© Canberra Times